Authors

Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson is the director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, a professor at the MIT Sloan School, and an award-winning researcher. His research examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity and employment. His recent work studies data-driven decision-making, the pricing implications of Internet commerce and the role intangible assets.

Brynjolfsson lectures worldwide on technology and strategy. Businessweek has profiled him as an “ebusiness visionary” and he is a director or advisor for several technology-intensive firms. His recent books include “Wired for Innovation: How IT is Reshaping the Economy” and “Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy.” He has Bachelors and Masters Degrees from Harvard and a Ph.D. from MIT.

Read his blog at http://www.economicsofinformation.com, download his papers from http://digital.mit.edu/erik and follow him on Twitter at @erikbryn

Andrew McAfee

Andrew McAfee, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Center for Digital Business, studies the ways that information technology (IT) affects business. His research investigates how IT changes the way companies perform, organize themselves, and compete. At a higher level, his work also investigates how computerization affects competition itself –  the struggle among rivals for dominance and survival within an industry.

He coined the phrase “Enterprise 2.0“ and his best-selling book on the topic was published in 2009 by Harvard Business School Press. In addition to Race Against the Machine his other recent publications include “What Every CEO Needs to Know About The Cloud,” which appeared in the November 2011 issue of Harvard Business Review.

He has been named one of the “100 Most Influential People in IT.”

He received his Doctorate from Harvard Business School, and completed two Master of Science and two Bachelor of Science degrees at MIT.

He maintains both a professional and personal blog, and also blogs for Harvard Business Review. Follow him on Twitter at@amcafee.